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Smoking Damages the Brain

Smoking Damages the Brain

Numerous studies have demonstrated that inhaling tobacco smoke increases the risk on various cancers, heart complications, stroke and other health problems. Now new research adds another hazard, but this time it’s a mental one: smoking may damage memory, learning and reasoning capacities – if you’re older than 50.

Researchers at King’s College, London, asked 8,800 people over the age of 50 to perform cognitive, verbal-fluency and attention tests. They were all tested again after four and then eight years. They also collected data about their health and lifestyle.

They found a “consistent association” between smoking and lower scores in all three tests. In addition, also subjects with high blood pressure or those who were at risk of a stroke performed poorly.

Dr Simon Ridley, from Alzheimer’s Research UK, said to BBC News: “Research has repeatedly linked smoking and high blood pressure to a greater risk of cognitive decline and dementia, and this study adds further weight to that evidence.

“Cognitive decline as we age can develop into dementia, and unravelling the factors that are linked to this decline could be crucial for finding ways to prevent the condition.

Source: BBC
Photo: smhweb/Flickr

Dregan, A., Stewart, R., & Gulliford, M. (2012). Cardiovascular risk factors and cognitive decline in adults aged 50 and over: a population-based cohort study Age and Ageing DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afs166

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Carian Thus
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4 Comments

  • Anna
    December 9, 2012, 01:52

    What about the people who smoke that are younger than age 50? does that affect them too, or do they just have to worry about that when they get old. Plus everyone forgets stuff as they get older, could that affect the results too? I feel like just testing people that are over the age of 50 isn’t going to solve the smoking problem. They already know the risks of doing it, if they haven’t quit yet why would they do it over something as in forgetting stuff?

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  • Theresa DeCosty
    December 10, 2012, 00:11

    This article is saying that people over the age of 50 can possibly suffer from a decline in cognitive thinking due to inhaling tobacco smoke. What happens to those people who are under 50 years of age? Does their brain and body not suffer from the same memory damage as those who are older? This article completely disregards the effects of smoking on all ages and portrays the worst effects to be when a person’s life span is more than half over. The money put into this study was pointless because by the time a person is 50 years old, their life is more than half over and their mind development isn’t as crucial as teenagers. I believe that people below the age of 50 suffer just as much, if not more from the effects of tobacco smoke. In a child’s developmental years, exposure to smoke can greatly impact their respiratory system, as well as mental capability. Therefore, I believe it is wrong to think that people over the age of 50 suffer more mentally.

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  • laithalharahsheh
    July 31, 2013, 19:25

    Good article, there is a method used by the and many Nftna which

    When you are at least thinking of taking that all important decision to stop this filthy

    habit called smoking, you need to write yourself a list. Write down yourself a list of WHY

    you should stop smoking and why you have decided to stop smoking.

    While you write down your list of your “Why’s”, I will give you another 2 lists for you to

    think about. Here’s the first one:

    • Straight after the decision to stop smoking, only just 20 minutes after your last

    cigarette, your heart rate falls and your blood pressure decreases.

    • After the first 8 hours of your last cigarette, the levels of nicotine and carbon

    monoxide in your body are reduced by at least half, and oxygen levels return to normal.

    • At 24 hours the carbon monoxide is totally discharged from the body.

    • 48 hours and there is no more nicotine in your body.

    Article source : http://1betteroff.blogspot.com/2013/06/what-are-damages-of-smoking-most-facts.html

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