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Green Tea Good For Your Brain

Green Tea Good For Your Brain

Green tea’s anti-oxidant power makes it an ideal brain food.

Do you love green tea and drink it often? Well there’s some good news for you, according to new research published in the journal of Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, green tea is good for brain cells, specifically for memory and spatial learning.

The key aspect of the tea is known as EGCG (epigallocatechin-3 gallate), already a known anti-oxident, it is now believed to have a beneficial effect against age-related degenerative diseases. According to the research team from the Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, EGCG boosts the production of neural progenitor cells, which can adapt into various types of cells. They focused on the hippocampus, the part of the brain which processes information from short-term to long-term memory, to see how it is affected by this interesting anti-oxidant.

Based on studying the EGCG’s effect on laboratory mice, subjecting them to tests that require remembering objects and paths.  Their results reveal that, as they had proposed, mice who had been exposed to EGCG had a better memory as well as special recognition.  Based on these results researchers can now move forward to find out just how effective properties found within green tea could be towards combating degenerative diseases and memory loss in humans.

Source: Australasian Science Magazine

ReferenceYanyan Wang, Maoquan Li, Xueqing Xu, Min Song, Huansheng Tao, & Yun Bai (2012). Green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) promotes neural progenitor cell proliferation and sonic hedgehog pathway activation during adult hippocampal neurogenesis Journal of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.201200035

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3 Comments

  • Dondelinda Meyers
    September 6, 2012, 19:20

    I’m 132 cm tall and weigh an even 50Kg. How much tea do I have to drink (at standard concentration) to see/feel a benefit? Unknown at this point . . . and so are the data for various teas and brewing techniques. Point being- green tea MAY be good for the brain BUT until there is some sort of protocol established that can regularize consumption against effect, EGCG is pretty much still a leap-of-theory for humans. But that is a provocative title.

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  • Padre
    September 7, 2012, 12:04

    Well, better question is how much of it enters your bloodstream before the gastric system is done with it.

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  • Nietzsche
    February 2, 2014, 12:18

    and what about white tea?

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